Baboons of Nakuru Park

Thank you and a big welcome to my newest followers: Alan (an awesome photoblogger), Ms. Burrito (a 5 year old emerging blogger), Paco (who has an artsy photoblog) and Cathy Lookabaugh. Cathy you don't have a website link so I can't visit you.

There is so much to see at the Nakuru National Park and I've had to split the photos into several posts (you can find the links to these and to my other travel posts on Kenya at the bottom of this post). In today's post, I bring you to Baboon Point one of my favourite places in the park.

One of the reasons I enjoy Baboon Point on Baboon Cliff is because of the spectacular views. Here from high up you have a fantastic view of Lake Nakuru.  Another reason is to see the troop of baboons. Baboons like to live in groups or troops of 20-100.  Each troop is protected by one or more dominant males.

A baboon is basically a type of monkey and is easily recognizable by a large head and cheek pouches.  The baboon also has a long jaw and this enables them to store food in their cheek pouches just like a chipmunk.


Isn't the view stunning? I love that I can see the winding dirt path that brought us from the lake to the cliffs.

This photo is taken just a little more to the left of the photo above.

This is one place where it is gratifying to see a lot of locals and African visitors.
There are so many baboons to keep everyone occupied in watching them, hence the name "Baboon Cliff".

I tried to zoom in on the lake.
These baboons are ignoring me.

These baboons are doing what baboons love to do.  They love to explore cars and will get into them if you are not careful.
Something inside this car has caught this baboon's eye.

Baboons have long, powerful limbs and can travel at high speeds.  Their buttocks are hairless and are often a bright colour.  Their fur is coarse and usually short and they can come in a variety of colours from blondish to a dark brown.

The baboons seem oblivious to humans but I wonder if they would like to tell us to 'get lost'?
Here a baboon is grooming another.

Just chillaxin'

Another spectacular view.

Pondering life's big questions.  The baboon is a very intelligent animal and can be trained.

I tried unsuccessfully to capture a photo of the baby baboon with it's mother under this picnic table.


Baboons are social creatures.  The female baboons are about half the size of the males and they produce one baby baboon after carrying it for a 6 month period.

I transferred my attention from the picnic table to take a photo of this mother and her baby.

A group of baboons is called a troop.  Unfortunately they are big pests for Kenya's farmer and can inflict a lot of damage on crops.  So while we tourists may like the baboon,  the local farmers do not.

Even baboons get tired. Maybe this one is bored with the tourists that day! LOL

Baboons eat a variety of things like worms, insects, reptiles, small mammals, fruits, vegetation and eggs. I didn't get to see any baboon having a meal that day. Perhaps another day.

Please come again for more of my expedition to Kenya.  If you haven't been on the trip before today you can catch up by checking out the links below.  Thank you for visiting!

~~~~~~~~~

Click here to read Part 1 in this series. It starts with my stopover in Nairobi, Kenya.
Click here to read Part 2 in this series in Kenya. It continues with my sojourn in Nairobi, Kenya.
Click here to read Part 3 in this series on Kenya where I stop to view a stunning lookout.
Click here to read Part 4 in this series on Kenya where I stop at Lake Elementeita.
Click here to read Part 5 in this series on Kenya where I talk about some hotels in Nakuru.
Click here to read Part 6 in this series on Kenya where I show you some tourist sites around Nakuru.
Click here to read Part 7 in this series on Kenya where I show you the Castle Without a Princess.
Click here to read Part 8 in this series on Kenya where I feature a collection of scenes from around Nakuru. 
Click here to read Part 9 in this series where we enter the park and begin to tour it. 
Click here to read Part 10 about the flamingos and water buffalo. 


Click on the MW badge above to see more of our spectacular world and please do leave a comment below before you go.

63 comments:

  1. Nice shots and an interesting explanation of baboons. I've never seen one outside a zoo.

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  2. Al, thank you for the visit. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Perhaps one day you will get to see the baboons and other wildlife from Kenya outside of a zoo. Though these days, some zoos are fantastic. I especially like the one in Seattle where they have replicated an African savannah though I haven't been there in years.

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  3. That must have been so much fun. It's interesting how they mix with the tourists like that.--Inger

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  4. What an interesting and educational post. Great photos!

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  5. CG, yes it was so much fun. I LOVE going to this park and on other safaris in Kenya because the wildlife is prolific, though I am saddened that some animals are dying out. Like lions. So sad.

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  6. Karen, thank you for kind comments!

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  7. Interesting about why the baboon has a long jaw … I had no idea. I also didn’t realize that baboons mingle so freely with people and would have assumed that under certain circumstances they could be dangerous. I couldn’t agree more about the winding path, Joyful. It must be awe-inspiring to actually be there. :)

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  8. akaPenelope, actually baboons can be dangerous but I haven't had any problems whatsoever at this place with the baboons. The tourists generally leave the baboons alone and simply watch them. The baboons are very habituated to people but I'm sure if you get in their way or do something to make them upset or what have you, you do so at your own peril. Baboons have sharp claws and are very strong.

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  9. What an incredible place. Wonderful shots.

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  10. This is a very interesting and informative post.

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  11. Martha, I'm glad you enjoyed the post about teh baboons.

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  12. Surely seems a fun day out! My kids would love it there! And I love that photo with a spectacular view, baboon included!

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  13. Thank you Mirage. There are many sites in Kenya that I'm absolutely certain your children would love. They would have an experience of a lifetime. In fact, you would too!

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  14. Oh my gosh, what amazing photos!!! Totally fabulous!!!
    XO

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  15. Cindy, I'm so happy you enjoyed the tour!

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  16. I have a lot of respect for baboons not only are their teeth big they are very sharp!! I saw the damage they did to 3 very large farm dogs in Zimbabwe and only two survived. Great photos and yes the view is lovely. Diane

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  17. Thank you for your comment, Diane. I see you have first hand experience with the dangerous side of baboons.

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  18. Great post Penny ... Baboons intrigue me and I have the greatest respect for them ... they are found all over Namibia, even in the most inhospitable areas ... to me, they are the Ultimate Survivors ...

    I have tried in the past to rear orphan Baboons but let me tell you, they are a handful - incredibly powerful.

    ... I've heard of farmers training Baboons as shepherds but not seen it for myself.

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  19. You are an adventurous one, Graham trying to rear baboons. But I guess if they were orphans I can understand why. They are definitely an intriguing animal but then, I find most wild animals of Africa intriguing.

    I'm guessing it might be hard to train a baboon to be a shepherd but probably harder if you want them to watch over your crops ;-)

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  20. Very good shots of the lake and beautiful Africa from Baboon Point. Isn't it just so spectacular? I love the baboon pics too. This is the first time I see a mother with its baby - carrying on it's back, not under the tummy like monkeys do. Thanks for whetting my appetite. As you know Nakuru Park is only about two hours from where I live and we'll visit it shortly. Bless you my friend. Jo

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  21. Thank you Jo. I'm so glad you are enjoying what I consider to be one of the most fascinating and spectacular countries I have yet to visit. I'm glad too that I can show you some new things although I think baboons also carry their young under the tummy when they are very small. I'm sure you're going to love the park when you do get there. You won't stop snapping photos :-) Hugs and blessings my friend. xx

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  22. Now that really is a back yard!

    Interesting words and pictures.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Australia

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  23. LOL, Stewart it really is. Who knew baboons had it so good! Thanks for your visit.

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  24. hanks for sharing this. It is not often I see shots from Africa. :)

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  25. You're welcome, NatureFootstep :-)

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  26. Thank you for sharing this wonderful set of photos. Animals are always most interesting in their natural habitat. In my country however we have to go to a zoo to see African animals.
    Thanks for your visit and have a very happy week.

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  27. That was very interesting. I now know more about baboons than I did when I got up this morning. Great post.

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  28. une belle rencontre avec tous ces singes

    Publicity ;o) Every Friday (and the Weekend), The Challenge "Walk In The Street Photography"

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  29. RW, thank you. Yes, it is the same for me too so I love to get out in the wild and see them in their natural habitat.

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  30. Donnie, you're welcome. Glad you enjoyed it.

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  31. I wished I could see them just like that ! I only saw them in a zoo.

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  32. Hi Gattina, I feel very blessed to see the baboons and all the other creatures in the place where they really live.

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  33. great shots of a lovely place. it must be amazing to get up close and personal with baboons. thanks for the wonderful tour.

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  34. How lucky you are to see such a beautiful view and see baboons just wandering around. Those little babies are so cute. I guess you have to be careful though because they can be mean.

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  35. The size difference between males and females is quite extraordinary. What fascinating creatures they are:-)

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  36. LR, thanks so much for the kind words. It was a delight for me to spend time close up with the wildlife in Kenya.

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  37. Candy, I do consider myself lucky, and yes, you do have to be careful and respect the wildlife.

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  38. Jabblog, the baboons are quite fascinating and very entertaining to watch.

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  39. Wow..so they aren't too discriminating? No wonder the farmers see things differently! I bet they could pack a mean punch..are they dangerous..or as moody like that chimp? Well I had no idea they stored the food in their cheeks or were that fuzzy looking! The car shots are my favorite- especially the single one by the mirror and the expression below the picnic table. But you did manage to catch the baby on the mama! How cool. The first photos of the landscape almost look like an aerial view..really spacious and green! This was a great tour Penny~

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  40. Wow interesting and awesome captures!
    Happy weekend.

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  41. I bet baboons are capable of getting into lots of mischief. They seem to be very curious about!

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  42. Interesting captures! Love to see them sometime!

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  43. Wonderful shots of nice place.

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  44. Great images. The baboons are having good time there.

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  45. Jabblog, the baboons are quite fascinating and very entertaining to watch.

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  46. LR, thanks so much for the kind words. It was a delight for me to spend time close up with the wildlife in Kenya.

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  47. great shots of a lovely place. it must be amazing to get up close and personal with baboons. thanks for the wonderful tour.

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  48. Donnie, you're welcome. Glad you enjoyed it.

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  49. Thank you for sharing this wonderful set of photos. Animals are always most interesting in their natural habitat. In my country however we have to go to a zoo to see African animals.
    Thanks for your visit and have a very happy week.

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  50. Thank you Jo. I'm so glad you are enjoying what I consider to be one of the most fascinating and spectacular countries I have yet to visit. I'm glad too that I can show you some new things although I think baboons also carry their young under the tummy when they are very small. I'm sure you're going to love the park when you do get there. You won't stop snapping photos :-) Hugs and blessings my friend. xx

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  51. Thank you for your comment, Diane. I see you have first hand experience with the dangerous side of baboons.

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  52. Cindy, I'm so happy you enjoyed the tour!

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  53. Surely seems a fun day out! My kids would love it there! And I love that photo with a spectacular view, baboon included!

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  54. What an incredible place. Wonderful shots.

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  55. Karen, thank you for kind comments!

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  56. Al, thank you for the visit. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Perhaps one day you will get to see the baboons and other wildlife from Kenya outside of a zoo. Though these days, some zoos are fantastic. I especially like the one in Seattle where they have replicated an African savannah though I haven't been there in years.

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